How to Design Your Landscape Like a Professional

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To design your landscape like a professional you should keep in mind some of the key principles of designing step by step.

Some of the principles have been shown below. These principles of design are guidelines which can be used to generalities of landscaping ideas to specifics. It involves seven traits that, when given proper consideration, will allow any design to be unified, cohesive and beautiful. These principles will also affect how the design feels, flows and works.

These designing principles have no specific order or hierarchy. They can each be critical or not apply at all, depending on the situation. They are general themes and easy to comprehend. Once understood and applied, their impact will vastly improve any sustainable designs and will make you design contents like a professional.

Simplicity

First component we come across so as to design the landscape like a professional is the simplicity as more simple the elements would be more attractive it would be. Elements that do not provide improvement or impact on the design can be omitted. Prioritize what is important and what is not in order to keep the design clean, neat and uncluttered.

A simple, well-defined design is one that will be easier to maintain and increase functionality.

Variety

Another element we come across is the variety as following the same design rules would be boring for the audience therefore so as to bring more diversity you should add more variety and more features to your design. Shape, size and form selections should be diverse in order to create visual interest. However, do not forfeit simplicity merely to create varied combinations.

Balance

Designing a landscape needs professionalism and to made it so the perfect balance is required. Everything should be in perfect balance none of the element should overpower another thus Everything that is placed in a design will carry a certain visual weight with it. Balance is the concept of ensuring the weight feels even throughout the plan.

A plan with formal balance will have both sides mirroring each other, while informal balance refers to equal but not matching. Both can work well.

Sequence /proportion

To design your landscape like a professional the next element which we need is sequence and accurate proportion of our elements. As if anything we put in access then our landscape would be overpowering with any one element which is not a good sign of professionalism thus The size of the components in a landscape is scale and how they relate to each other is proportion. ​The size of your landscape and the items in it should all be balanced.

Unity

Last element or principle which you should take care off is the unity that everything which you embedded is coming together and your moto of the design is fulfilled.

Unity is the concept that everything works together. Interconnection is gaining unity by using connections such as paths, walkways, stairs and fences to physically link areas. Repetition is when an aspect of design is unifying because it occurs in several areas. Repetition can be helpful but take care not to overuse it. Dominance is when other areas appear to unify in support a single focal point, perhaps a large tree.

If you find that your landscape is fully satisfying, then Congratulations!

You have successfully designed a landscape which is professional and is attractive and accurate as it comprises of all the designing principles which we stated above. This is how you design the landscape like a professional.

 

Here’s the video tutorial you want to start your landscape design skills with (from Jeff Wortham, landscape architect):

 

About Amanda

I love to buy a lot of products for the home, and dissect them out. I split them into duds and winners, and share the findings here on my site. As a reader of my site, I'm hoping for your next purchase to be an informed and inspired one.

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